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In designing dramatic campaigns we focus on the character, creating intimate settings that allow Players to inhabit their character’s background, leading (hopefully) to the flourishing of the character(s). What does this mean for action adventures? If we put less focus on character backgrounds, what role do Players have in creating an action setting?

Watch the Table

When we talked about dramatic games, we talked about watching what goes on around the table, working to support the other Players’ character actions, and working toward safe cathartic emotional bleed. In action adventure games, by contrast, we talk about watching what goes on on the table. This includes maps, miniatures, dice, character sheets, and rules.In a dramatic game, scenes can float from location to location without too much concern for continuity of action. But in action adventure games, maps are important in determining where and how the action takes place.

Action Play

When we talked about dramatic play, we found it was heavily character-driven instead of action-driven. When playing action campaigns, there are ideas you must balance. The first things to consider are the action scenes of the pulp genre and tactical play; imagine your characters in action while building them. You also need to have a good grip on the rules, so you can stay up with the other Players and match the fast pace of action games. Speaking of the Players, since these games focus on goal accomplishments, it's important to remember that your missions will require teamwork.

An Action Adventurer

Last time, we focused on my addiction to drama and making characters that try to fit into the genre. I also mentioned my interest in Korean action films, and I should add Chinese films, too. To me the film industries of these two countries lead the action movie genre, especially for gamers. If you want to get into this, listen to the Jianghu Hustle podcast.

Intimate Settings

Your character is set, their tragic life is just getting started, and you understand all about being a supporting actor; now it's time to turn toward creating a dramatic atmosphere. When talking about Setting we need to consider both the campaign setting and individual scenes. The campaign setting is there to set the general themes of the drama, while individual scenes provide space for each character to show off their feelings about the world around them, and to indicate how the story affects them.

Sit Back and Enjoy the Popcorn

Dramatic characters require dramatic scenes, often spotlighting one or two PCs or NPCs, but how do we do this when games are designed to be a group effort? It’s simple: just learn to let someone else be the star for a bit. This isn’t a new idea, so let’s go through some of the methods you can use to help your friends bring their characters to the forefront.

Role Playing Drama vs. Mechanics

The above guidelines give us some key things to shoot for when creating a dramatic character, but of course the real question is how to play one. Many of us act dramatically in our games accidentally, but few of us plan for it or do it on purpose. If one is encouraged to take improv classes (as some do to learn how to respond to assorted challenges in gaming), we shouldn’t ignore dramatics. Most of us have some ideas about what drama is, but these ideas are often limited to the exaggerated, black-vs-white tropes of melodrama.

Creating Dramatic Characters

Previously we talked about creating character backgrounds, and we even tried our hand at focusing on secondary attributes to create multi-dimensional characters. In today's blog entry I want to go more in-depth, looking at the mechanics of a dramatic character.

Sports in Games

From the Ancient Olympics to the “Three Manly Skills” of the Huns―have played an important role in numerous civilizations. Since this is the case, why do we not see these in our fiction and role-playing settings? There have been a few attempts at sports-based RPG games like World Wide Wrestling or XXXX Extreme Street Luge, but very few sports are ever mentioned in non-Earth settings. This is a shame, because a good sport brings out many of the same opportunities as murder-hoboing―but without all the murdering!

What Gets Me Mad about Actual Plays

Over the last few years I have replaced my weekend Netflix video binging with AP watching, so I am becoming very familiar with AP (“Actual Play”) tropes. While there are a few different types, such as studio shows vs remote games, the ones that totally annoy me are the viewer participation types. Some people may tell me I'm wrong, but hey: this is my March Madness, and my soapbox.

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