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Campaign Balance

For a while, I have been kicking an idea around in my head about campaign stages and game balance. I'm not the only one; other game designers have created mechanics around the idea. For example, the D&D world introduced the epic tier level starting with 3ed, and 4ed put it into the Player Handbook. 13th Age expanded on the idea, creating adventurer, champion and epic tiers that add different abilities and modifiers at each stage.

Every Encounter an Emotion

Some people are influenced by books or music. I'm influenced by movies. Because of this, I often watch the short clips of Tony Zhou’s Every Frame a Painting to learn tradecraft. The last one I watched was “Akira Kurosawa: Composing Movement.” While watching, I realized it was full of advice that players could use for their characters.

A Hard Start

About 9 months ago I had an idea for a unique approach to a gaming supplement, as well as half a dozen other supplements for various genres, and a name. At that point in my life starting a gaming company seemed like a great idea, as I took care of my parents. And so began Chromatic Chameleon.

Being Multi-Dimensional

Last week, we had an interesting look at the different ways to use secondary characteristics to add dimension to your characters. It is not enough to read your background…”I am a fighter who is a butcher.” You have to actually play these attributes in order to improve your role playing. Say we’re playing Star Trek, for example. Let’s say you create an amazing engineer character. That’s great; you keep the ship running. However, by simply adding a high social attribute and some carousing skills, you get… Scotty!

Meta Games are Secondary Games.

During the past few weeks, we talked a bit about the power of the secondary. I showed that by focusing on the secondary attributes we can add useful dimensions to our characters. These aspects really come together when we start using them in play. They help to define our characters outside of combat. These attributes also have purpose beyond the table.

Critique Role: Cooperation not Collusion

Welcome to my new article series: ”Critique Role,” an irregular critique of live gaming. In this installment I’ll be talking about “Critical Role” - a D&D game. Because we all know D&D and you can always watch the episodes for yourself, I’ll skip the details here. Suffice it to say that several weeks ago the Critical Role crew set out to play a social adventure in the big city, but like most D&D games, it turned into a bloody combat. No biggie, that happens all the time, right?

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