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Relating to the World

Throughout this blog I have stressed the role of Players becoming more proactive when it comes to developing the setting of their world. One of the key ways to do this is to understand how they interact with the world. In “The Power to Name,” we talked about the power to control your own background relationships. This time we'll talk about the rest of the setting. NPCs are often played in a conflicting manner: either directly as enemies or as “Hostile Witnesses,” as many GMs tend not to want to give the milk away for free.

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The Gaming Group

As I started to write section, the old Mr. Roger’s song, “Who are the People in your Neighborhood? came to mind, but in this case it was “Who are the People in the Gaming Group?” For some of us they are just acquaintances, but they are often our best friends and loved ones; and let's not forget our “frienemies”―for they too inhabit our neighborhood.

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Relating to Relationships

Relationships are complex and prone to change, and because of this they often play a secondary role in games. But this is a shame and not at all realistic: there are many views on relationships and thousands of books written on the subject of relationships, obviously it must be highly important.

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Party Like its…1107

Looking back at the previous points, we saw that celebrations are great opportunities to show off various aspects of your character. They give you a reason to live, not just to struggle and kill. We learned that the key to roleplaying a celebration is understanding the rituals of the celebration, and the various ways your character might approach these rituals. When we talked about hanging out with friends in the meta-gaming section, we observed that celebrations help bond friendships and can extend far beyond gaming. Similarly, a good celebration in-game should bond our PCs.

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Celebrate Tonight!

We are going to go uber-meta and a little personal now, and talk about celebrating with our gaming friends. Over the years I've been around many different types of groups, from childhood through college into adulthood. I was closer to some of the people in certain groups than others. Each of these groups provided me with different types of non-game relationships. When I was a teen my friends and I did most of the same things as other teens. We would go to the movies, or to each other’s birthday parties.

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The Band Played On

We have talked about creating a celebration; now it's time to think about the celebrating. I wanted to simply entitle this piece “Celebrate Good Times,” but if you think about it, not all celebrations are good times. Some are somber occasions, some are evil revelries, and some are just gatherings. Some of them get perverted over time, picking up new meanings and changing into new celebrations. Keep in mind that there are two formative aspects of celebrations in our games: Player-designed celebrations and GM-designed celebrations.

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Celebrate Good Times - or Not!

In all role-playing games there is a time to kill and a time to die, but often we have time to celebrate too. These celebrations are created by the GM, and Players just seem to show up for the encounter. But what is the point of all this killing and dying if we are not living? What do you live for?

One way we express the desire for living is by celebrating!

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Retired but Not Forgotten

We create characters to send them on mighty and terrifying adventures. Whether designing for action adventure or deep knowledge, we strive to use the rules to make these characters the best they can be. In earlier posts we have discussed ongoing character development, and even the possibility of character death and its impact on the setting. So what about the tradition of retiring characters?

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Art in Gaming

The world is a visual place, and the same is true of your campaign world. Speaking as a game designer, art is one of the most important aspects of a game. Don’t believe me? Crack open a Monty Cook game or your PHB: high-quality art is everywhere, and it brings up immediate responses from viewers. Set pieces like Horror on the Orient Express and most of the popular Pathfinder games also come to mind. At the campaign level, if you have access to good art you can convey a better story. I can't even think of a character that I haven’t tried to draw at the gaming table.

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What is a Horror Game?

What goes into a good horror story or game? Good question. After much internet research, I have come to a general theory of how one should create the horror story, as well as the various roles PCs might play within it. This article will explore this theory from a player's perspective, to help you help your GM with the game.

Stages of Horror


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